Kodak Tri-X 400

After having used Fuji Neopan 400 whenever I wanted to use a fast film , I am now looking to replace it with a film of similar quality now that manufacturing was ceased by Fuji. I have used Ilford HP5+ before with decent results but I was hoping to find something less grainy. Of course, everybody has been raving about Kodak Tri-X 400 for decennia but I haven’t used it for a long time and, more importantly, have never developed it myself. So last week I bought a five pack of Tri-X and took it to the test this weekend.

Kodak Tri-X 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.Kodak Tri-X 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes.

Although the grain is noticeable less than what I got with Ilford HP5+, the resulting image is more contrasty than I would like to see, especially as it was a very dreary day which should have resulted in pretty flat negatives.

Kodak Tri-X 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.Kodak Tri-X 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Developed in HC-110 dilution E for 6.5 minutes.

There is very little detail in the shadows. It looks like I need to pull this film a bit to reduce contrast or develop it for a shorter period. Having developed this film in HC-110 Dilution E, I probably need to go to Dilution H to better control the time.

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Accidental stitched photos

During the long autumn and winter evenings I like to browse through my photos and occasionally I spot a few shots that have overlap and can be stitched into something surprisingly satisfying. This works as well with digital shots as with scanned film images although for the latter you might need to supply a guestimate of the focal length used.

IMGP0152 Panorama

Click through on the image of my wife crossing a stream in the Lake District for a better view. When I first started stitching photos together I had it in my mind that I only could do it for a few photos where I had panned the camera so that I would end up with a panorama, but it works equally well for photos of the same angle where the subject has moved. The resulting image may not be great, but I find it interesting and pleasing, many times better than the original photos that I had already marked as junk.

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Pinhole for your (D)SLR

You want to turn your SLR or DSLR into a pinhole camera? I picked up one of these cheap Holga HPL-P lenses for my Pentax cameras and it works wonders. The HPL-X lenses also exist for Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Samsung NX, Sony and Panasonic cameras. They’re easy to use, at Ø=0.25mm and 28mm, it has a corresponding aperture of f/112.

IMGP0673

Finding the correct exposure can be a bit of trial and error although it should be easy if you have an external lightmeter and bracketing will certainly help to narrow it down. If you shoot film I would certainly recommend a lightmeter and the use of this table to find the right exposure.

Note that even though these lenses are advertised to be usable on SLRs as well, do expect a lot of vignetting as the lens will not cover the whole negative and is clearly designed to work on DSLRs with cropping factors of at least 1.5.
Vignetting of this pinhole lens on an SLR

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CAPTCHA blues

I now start to wonder whether or not I’m am a robot with human memory implants: Some of the CAPTCHA security that blogs have implemented in their comment sections to keep the robots out is simply ridiculous and probably guarantees they’ll never get a proper comment as any normal person would give up after 5 attempts of guessing what that mess of letters could be….

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