Infrared: Efke IR820 film

After having used infrared film in 2012 and earlier, I have been struggling a bit with fogging. I’m pretty sure the problem was due to the fact that it takes a while to load my Pentax 67II; my Pentax 645NII is much easier to load in a darkened room so I went back to this camera even though it meant that I had to remember to switch off the exposure data recording on the side of the negative as this also fogs the Efke IR820 film.

Efke IR820 at EI 100, developed in APH 09 1:40 for 11 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

This summer I wanted to try again, I followed the notes that I had taken for this film and used F/11 and 0.5 seconds as exposure on that fine and sunny day.

Efke IR820 at EI 100, developed in APH 09 1:40 for 11 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds Efke IR820 at EI 100, developed in APH 09 1:40 for 11 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

As I was only experimenting, trying to see if I could successfully expose and develop a roll of Efke IR820 film, I only exposed a handful of negatives. Of course, then the weather changed and the clear skies and burning sun were gone.

Efke IR820 at EI 100, developed in APH 09 1:40 for 11 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds Efke IR820 at EI 100, developed in APH 09 1:40 for 11 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

I didn’t want to wait too long before developing the film, so in the end I decided to expose the last frames as a normal ISO 100 film without using the Hoya R72 filter. What do you know, the results are a bit grainy for an ISO 100 film, but overall it isn’t a bad film.

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