Category Archives: Photo Walk

Temple 32: Hosho-ji

This will be a series of occasional blog posts going into a few more details of the Chichibu 34 Kannon Temples pilgrimage that I walked in October/November 2013.

One of the most impressive temples of the pilgrimage is Temple 32, Hosho-ji. The much photographed Kannon hall is located next to a cave, very picturesque, but there is also a path that will lead you to another kannon statue and a nice view.

 Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds. Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

When waiting for the stamp, the monk pointed us to a set of stone  ‘footsteps,’ standing on the footsteps ,you could just make out a kannon statue on the top of the rock. It takes about an hour to visit and the path involves a bit of climbing and holding onto iron chains and railings for dear life. There were signs up there in kanji which I, unfortunately, couldn’t read but after a while I made it up to one of the statues.

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds. Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

I would have liked to explore the other directions but with my wife and friend waiting below, I chose to climb down again.

Travelling with the Pentax 67II

Going on a trip with my Pentax 67II is definitely different from travelling with my Pentax 645NII. The Pentax 645NII I can use like a 35mm camera, it goes everywhere and I can shoot it handheld at amazing low shutter speeds. I have brought it on my last two trips to Japan as my only camera.
The Pentax 67II, on the other hand, is too heavy to carry in a rucksack during our hikes so I found myself spotting for locations and then returning to these locations afterwards by car to actually shoot. A completely different experience for me and I came home with a very different set of my normal photos, far fewer snapshots, more thinking about the shots in advance.

ADOX CHS 25 ART; stand developed: pre-soaked for 5 minutes followed by APH 09 developer in a 1:150 dilution, 1 gr borax; agitated for the 1st minute and then left to stand for 2 hours.

Blast furnace of Belval

July 4 marked the date that blast furnace B opened its doors in Beval in the very south of Luxembourg, a few hundred meters away from the French border. Having worked almost next door and endured the constant noise, tremors and dust of the construction for so many months, I was keen to get inside and change my view of the annoyance that is working next to a construction site to the pleasure that is working next door to a great photo location.

The other blast furnace from the ground.</p><br />
<p>ADOX CHS 100 ART at EI 100, stand developed in APH 09 dilution 1:150 for 2 hours  The smallest of the blast furnaces in Belval, shot from the other blast furnace.</p><br />
<p>Foma Fomapan 200 @ EI 200; developed in HC-110 dilution H for 7 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

I was not disappointed:The surroundings were transformed and the view over Belval was magnificent. For me the most fascinating part is the hall on the first floor where there is plenty of space and original parts of the furnace to imagine how working at a blast furnace must have been.

Foma Fomapan 400 @ EI 1600; developed in HC-110 dilution B for 13 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every minute Foma Fomapan 400 @ EI 1600; developed in HC-110 dilution B for 13 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every minute

Detail of the blast furnace in Belval.</p><br />
<p>Foma Fomapan 200 @ EI 200; developed in HC-110 dilution H for 7 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds A look inside the blast furnace, the tuyeres or nozzles that blew in the oxygen rich air are visible.</p><br />
<p>Foma Fomapan 200 @ EI 200; developed in HC-110 dilution H for 7 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

But also the view from the 40 meter high platform is worth the climb with a view of the Halle des Soufflantes and the gas cleaning tanks and pipes surrounding the blast furnace.

Foma Fomapan 100 @ EI 100; developed in HC-110 dilution H for 10 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds Foma Fomapan 100 @ EI 100; developed in HC-110 dilution H for 10 minutes, agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds

Belval is really recommended for a Photo Walk!

The old road to Nara

There is a lot more to Nara than just Nara Park with its famous temples and its hordes of tourists being enthralled by the deer. If you prefer to venture a bit off the beaten track there is this rather unique walk that even the most seasoned visitor of Japan hasn’t done yet: From the beautiful Yagyū no sato (柳生の里) area east of Nara, the Takisaka-no-michi is a 12km, 3 hours walk  from Enjō-ji Temple to Nara Park.

The path of the Takisaka-no-michi

Take the bus from Nara JR Station to Enjō-ji Temple, ask the tourist information at the station for bus number and pick up a Nara Bus Pass as the trip is covered by the pass. Enjō-ji Temple is already worth the trip, but once you’re done there, take the footpath that starts on the other side of the road via which you arrived. You’re now on the Takisaka-no-michi which first leads up gently and then descends towards Nara past tea fields, a tea house (a stop here is recommended!), Ojizō-sama statues and plenty of rock carvings of monks and Ojizō-sama.

Ilford HP5+ at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution H for 10 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

<br />
Buddha images carved into the rock in the 13th century.

The walk is easy and doesn’t require any particular skills or any particular fitness. If you have a look at the map provided by the tourist board, you will notice a loop just past the halfway point: if you turn left here there is a little more climbing to be done through a gorge with some beautiful rock carvings, but if you would like to take it easy, just continue and both routes will join again a little later.

What I particularly liked about this walk was that it led through so many different landscapes: First meandering over the tops of the mountains, then down into a rural valley with farms and the tea harvest in progress. A little further the landscape changed again dramatically when we descended into the gorge and crossed the river over tiny bridges. After we left the gorge and entered the forest again, we eventually joined a river again and the unpaved footpath changed into a flagstone paved path that must have been important and probably filled with pilgrims in the past. The path eventually led us back to Nara.
The walk was quiet, we met a few Japanese tourists and didn’t run into the crowds again until we entered Nara Park. None of the people in the crowd seemed to sense that there was so much more to be enjoyed in Nara.

Somerset House

Having lived around London for several years and having carried my camera on me for many an impromptu photo walk, I usually went to the South Bank if I didn’t go to the Battersea area. I liked the space you have on the banks of the River Thames and the chances for some easy street photography with the tourists and the performers.

So, many times I have walked underneath Waterloo Bridge being intrigued by the underside of the bridge or by the skateboarders on the Southbank Skatepark, but little did I know that a far more interesting place lies just on the other side of the river: Somerset House.

Ilford HP5+ at EI400; developed in HC-110,  dilution H, 10mins, agitiated every 30secs  Ilford HP5+ at EI400; developed in HC-110,  dilution H, 10mins, agitiated every 30secs

Somerset House has regular photo exhibitions, free access and a free guided tour. The most well known photography subjects in Somerset House are the Stamp Office staircase and the Nelson staircase.

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds. 
On my 35mm camera I had brought a 20mm lens to be able to get as much as possible inside the frame. The first time I visited I had loaded Ilford HP5+ at EI 400 which was perfect. The next time I visited I had loaded Fuji Acros 100 at EI 100 and that almost was a mistake as it was darker than you would expect.

North Sea Jazz Festival 1982 – Sun Ra Arkestra

Sun Ra and his Arkestra at the North Sea Jazz Festival – Saturday 17 July 1982.

A Sun Ra concert is something you will remember for the rest of your life: it is a mix between a big-band free-jazz concert, a religious ceremony and a trip to outer space. Long before UFO abduction stories had been heard of, Sun Ra (born Herman Poole Blount) had become convinced that his roots lay on the planet Saturn which he visited by spaceship and he developed “cosmic” philosophies and lyrical poetry as he preached “awareness” and peace above all in his music. No need to point out that the concert of Sun Ra and his Arkestra that I visited on the Roof Garden scene at the North Sea Jazz Festival 1982 was quite the spectacle with the space music, poem recitals and space costumes.

Chichibu 34 Kannon temples pilgrimage, day 4

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Above: Kannon hall at Temple #32

With only four temples left on my itinerary after a long third day, I was getting a bit into trouble as I was running out of time. Normally the last four temples take 2 days to visit with trips by infrequent buses or by taxi but I had only one day left of my vacation before I had to start to make my way to Narita to catch the plane back to Europe.  Luckily, our friend could take a day out of her busy schedule and drive us to the last of the temples. Kannon-sama immediately rewarded her with the most perfect autumn day and beautiful autumn colours in the mountains around Chichibu.

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Above: Kannon hall at Temple #31

My route this day was: Temple #32 U+2192.svg Temple #31 U+2192.svg Temple #33 U+2192.svg Temple #34.

There is a reason these are the last of the temples on the pilgrimage: These are the most beautiful of the pilgrimage and they are a reward for the effort of the whole pilgrimage.

The wooden Kannon hall at Temple #32 is half built into the rock and has an awesome veranda.  I climbed all the way to the top of the mountain ridge where a Kannon statue is placed, quite an adventure to reach this statue as you had to pull yourself up for the rock face with help of old iron chains and faded steps people had hacked out in the rock ages ago.
Coming down from the temple, we ran into a little old lady who was collecting ginkgo nuts, I described the encounter here.

The sanctum of Temple #31 came as a reward after climbing the 200 odd steps to reach it. The location with the rock and the waterfall was fabulous.

Reaching Temple #34 felt like an ending and the monk was very kind and interested. We sort of celebrated a bit, taking photos of me with my now completed nokyocho (納経帳) and he threw in a few good luck charms for free for good measure. Maybe the Japanese pilgrims are a bit more solemn but it felt great having completed the task I set for myself.
Afterwards we went to Mangan-no-yu, the nearby onsen, to relax and recover.

I felt really great for having completed the pilgrimage, but it felt a bit awkward for having taken the car for the last four temples, but then again, the description suggest buses or taxis for these temples which comes down to the same thing. The whole experience was very rewarding mainly because it finally, after all these years of visiting Japan, brought me into contact with so many Japanese people. All thanks to the kind people of Chichibu.

It has now become clear to me: we, as tourists, spend way too much time in the large cities and then we all visit the same famous shrines or temples and we think we visited Japan.  Tokyo – Kyoto – Osaka – Hiroshima – Tokyo is the standard itinerary and if we are adventurous, we throw in Takayama as well or join the large crowds at the temples in Nara.
Having lived in Holland, France, the UK and Sweden, I think I know the romantic image people have of Japan and why so many return slightly disappointed and convinced their image of Japan was just a pipe dream. People should break out of the mould and visit the Japanese countryside; that’s where the true Japan is to be found! That’s where Japan still exists!

Chichibu 34 Kannon temples pilgrimage, day 3

Kodak T-MAX 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 8:30 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Above: Temple #28 under the rock

Since I had sort of messed up the official route by visiting more temples the second day of pilgrimage, I had to wing it a little and try to reach Temple 30 in a day so I would have only one more day left.

My route this day was: Temple #24 U+2192.svg Temple #25 U+2192.svg Temple #26 U+2192.svg Temple #27 U+2192.svg Temple #28 U+2192.svg Temple #29 U+2192.svg Temple 30. Between Temple #29 and Temple #30 I took the train from Urayamaguchi station to Shiroku station as I was running out of time and the walk between those two temples was over two hours. The only time I felt uncomfortable walking along a major road next to heavy traffic was just after leaving Temple #24. The caretaker at Temple #24 had warned me about the dangers and how right he was: it was a very curvy and tight road with loads of trucks and fast driving cars coming around almost blind corners with no pavement for me to walk on.

Kodak T-MAX 400 at EI 400, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 8:30 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Above: Peaceful Temple #30 with its beautiful garden.

I was now really walking through the countryside and the pilgrimage had really grown on me by this time.  The temples were getting further apart again after they were rather close together on the second day.  I also started to get the feeling that fewer and fewer pilgrims would reach these temples and sometimes it took a bit of puzzling to find the location where to get the stamp as I don’t read kanji and a kind note on a door telling a pilgrim were to go was a big barrier.

I guess because I was carrying this large camera and camera bag around, this day monks and caretakers would regularly show me folders or photo albums  full of photographs of the temple. Really helpful if you don’t have much time to find the best angle for your shots :-)

Temple #28 was very impressive underneath its massive rock and Temple #30 was very peacefully located in a carefully constructed garden.

From Temple #30 I returned to Shiroku station and from there to Seibu Chichibu station.

Maybe a nice anecdote: When I walked up the hill to reach Temple #30, I passed three kids who were dillydallying on their way home after school. After exchanging “konnichiha’ as I passed them, they practiced their English on me but after a few replies to their “hello” ‘s and “how do you do”’s I walked on to be able to use the last light of the day for my photos as the temple was on a slope facing north and the sun had already set behind the mountain. By the time I had collected my stamp and finished my prayer, the kids showed up at the temple and very enthusiastically started relating the whole ‘adventure’ to their father, the monk of the temple when they discovered me again taking the last of my photos. Their story cut short and they mumbled ‘ah, ano hito’ after which they became all very shy all of a sudden :-)

Read all about the last day of the pilgrimage here.

Chichibu 34 Kannon temples pilgrimage, day 2

Fuji Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Above: Giant Ojizō-sama, Temple #10, Chichibu

A few days later, I set off for the second day of pilgrimage. This time I left much earlier and walked from Seibu Chichibu station to Temple #10 to continue at the next temple from where I had left off last time.

My route this day was: Temple #10 U+2192.svg Temple #11U+2192.svgTemple #12 U+2192.svg Temple #13 U+2192.svg Temple #14 U+2192.svg Temple #15 U+2192.svg Temple #16 U+2192.svg Temple #17 U+2192.svg Temple #18 U+2192.svg Temple #19 U+2192.svg Temple #20 U+2192.svg Temple #21 U+2192.svgTemple #22 U+2192.svg Temple #23

The recommended route for the second day would cut off at Temple #18 and return by train to Seibu Chichibu station, but as it was still early and I was still fit, I decided the push on and take an advance on the next day.

Fujichrome Velvia 50

Above: Ojizō-sama statues, Temple #19, Chichibu

At Temple #11 I had an amusing chat with the caretaker about from which country Häagen-Dazs ice cream originated and at Temple #16 I received a bit of chicken for lunch :-)
From Temple #18 until Temple #23 I kept bumping into the same person so it became a bit of a habit to have a short chat at every temple. I loved these little interactions with strangers, this happens so rarely – too rarely when visiting Japan.
At Temple #15 I ran into a group of five pilgrims and we had a long chat. They asked me where I was from and long after we had said goodbye, I could still hear them talking about Holland. I ran into the same group at the end of the day at Seibu Chichibu station as they had just returned from Temple #19 and it felt like meeting friends.
Temple #12 was meticulously kept and at Temple #13 everybody was served a cup of tea (supposedly good for eyesight) and a short manga featuring the temple and explaining its background and why it does have a kindergarten associated with it. Temple #20 was very beautifully situated.
Temple #17 and the old bridge between Temples #19 and #20 had featured in the well-known Anohana anime and when I arrived at Temple #17 a couple of girls in cosplay were posing with their DSLR on a tripod. They had come on bicycle, so they were clearly going from location to location and, this I remember vividly, they were quite impressed with the sound of my Pentax 645NII medium format film camera :-)

From Temple #20 one really starts to enter the countryside with the very rural Temple #22 as highlight for this day. After visiting Temple #23 it got dark and, coming down the hill again, it was a straight shoot into town back to Seibu Chichibu station.

Read all about the third day of the pilgrimage here.