Tag Archives: meiji

Yoyogi Park and Meiji Shrine

Yesterday, I visited the Meiji Shrine and Yoyogi Park. I have been to Tokyo many times before and I do like to drop in on the places I visited before. We dropped in on the garden of the Empress Shoken which was in full flower. The irises where a little droopy after the recent typhoon and excessive rain of the last few days and that must have frustrated the several people painting the flowers as it would make their efforts look like cheap aquarelles had they painted according nature. I had loaded colour film for the occasion and am looking forward to some nice photos, especially of the people painting the flowers.

FUJICOLOR SUPERIA X-TRA400

We continued to the Meiji Shrine and it was wedding ceremony rush hour: For the day we visited, there were 18 weddings scheduled and during the 45 minutes we spent there, we saw 5 or 6 weddings, I lost count. I had a chat with one of the guards and he pulled out a large schedule with lots of information as to what shrine area the wedding took place, etc. I also had a chat with a Miko and she said that this time of the year was most popular which surprises me a little as it is supposed to be the rainy season. The ceremony is 1530000 yen in the weekend (40 persons) or 980000 yen (20 persons) but weekdays are a bargain at 380000 yen.

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

What surprised me the most was that all the bridegrooms looked like they were 20 or 22 years old at most, so young!!

FUJICOLOR SUPERIA X-TRA400

Notable fact: The Meiji Shrine wedding photographer uses two Pentax 67 cameras for his work!

We left the Shrine area and turned around to visit Yoyogi Park. This is an excellent area for a wannabe street photographer like me. It is very easy to walk up to the performers and either point at your camera or ask “shashin totte mo ii desu ka?” Invariably you’ll get a nod in agreement. I think the language barrier makes things even easier for once. Took some nice photos of saxophone players and drummers working some amazing rhythm on some African drums. While we were enjoying the atmosphere, the park guards rode their bikes up to the drummers and made them stop playing. Really too bad. I had a chat with the guys afterwards and they told me the guards were just doing their job. I was expecting them to be a bit more defiant, but they appeared to accept their fate without too much resentment. I told them that I didn’t really understand the logic of the guards, everybody visiting that area of the Yoyogi Park comes there for the spectacle and why pick on some awesome music? They wouldn’t byte, but when I left  I noted that they had started playing again. I guess it is just a friendly game with the guards as long as you play it the right way and don’t come on strong as my natural reaction would have been. Lesson learned! Smile

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.Fuji Neopan Acros 100 at EI 100, developed in HC-110 dilution E for 7 minutes. Agitation: 2 inversions every 30 seconds.

The photo on the right is of a professional saxophonist from Mali practising against a wall in the park, I guess he couldn’t practise at home. Two would-be-street-photographers were stalking him from a short distance. The guy looked amiable enough so I walked up to him and had a chat about Jazz music and favourite artists and finally I asked if I could photograph him while practising. He nodded and started jamming again. I took my shots, thanked him and nodded to the two other photographers on my way back who had watched the exchange with a bit of surprise. Smile Street photography is so easy in Japan!

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